DYNAMIC EDUCATION
Shadow
Slider

CONTINUING EDUCATION (CEU) COURSES

WHAT’S IN A CUSHION AND A BACK?

.15 CEU / 1.5 CONTACT HOUR
Often when a referral for a pressure injury is sent to a therapist the referral may request the therapist to change the cushion. When this occurs the therapist should reply “no”, I need to do a full seating assessment. The mat evaluation will help determine how much and where the client needs support and from that information, it is important to list the properties of the seating system that is required, in conjunction with the goals of the client. This workshop will discuss the purposes of both the cushions and backs supports, the properties of both and their impact on seating and positioning as well as their clinical implications. If possible there will be a hands-on portion exploring where and what to measure with regards to back and cushion support.

WHAT’S IN A BACK?

1 CEU / 1 CONTACT HOUR
The course will explore the properties of back supports and their impact on seating and positioning. Through demonstration and discussion the attendees will assess the differences from sling upholstery, tension adjustable, and rigid backs. An in depth look at the anatomy of the back and the key bony prominences that are important for back support assessments. Measurements to obtain for a variety of spinal deformities including kyphosis/scoliosis/lordosis and bariatric situations will be reviewed. Possible back support properties and their clinical implications will be explored. Is a tall back needed if the client is tall? Where is support needed? What angles and lateral supports are required? Does a rigid back improve propulsion efficiency for manu-al wheelchair users? There will be hands on portion finding the bony prominences as well as measure-ment exercises on each other.

WHAT’S IN A CUSHION?

.1 CEU / 1 CONTACT HOUR
This course will review the critical bony prominences with an in-depth look at how to measure the client and how the measurements relate to the seating system and the wheelchair. A poorly fitted system can lead to problems. For instance a cushion that is too long can pull a client into posterior pelvic tilt or too wide will decrease the efficiency of mobility. Each measurement will be considered and the implications of “a little bit too small” or “a little bit too big” will be reviewed. The properties of cushions will be reviewed with a look to the clinical implica-tions. The pros and cons of various materials and how they impact client function will be discussed.